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Round the Forest

Introduce forest animal sounds, and the concept of collaborative dramatic play to create an understanding of social emotional development, and expressive sound.

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What lies in the forest?

Invite children to play in an interactive game where they explore music, and the sounds of animals in the forest. 

This activity allows children to have fun and participate in parallel play, while learning about the sound that a forest animal, like a  bear, makes. Through this engaging activity, they will learn how to interact and communicate to work together. They will explore their fine motor development skills in a controlled environment set up as a circle. This increases their ability to follow rules and compromise with others. 

They will deepen their understanding of nature and life sciences by expressing sounds associated with the forest. Watch as they learn to take their turns, and mimic the sounds they interpret through listening. Happy passing!

Create a leadership opportunity for children to lead the group in imitating animals, or naming some forest animal names.

Ask toddlers what sounds some forest animals make (i.e - bear, moose, owls, etc)

Materials

For this developmental activity you will need:

Ball

Music

Learning Outcomes

Domain

Social (Primary), Physical (Secondary), Emotional (Tertiary)

Skills

Expressive Language (Speaking), Receptive Language (Listening), Fine Motor Development, Music

Indicators:

Use expressive sound to engage in dramatic play through physical development. This form of play will enhance  a child’s understanding of the sounds in nature. They will build upon the sound from music, and identify the sounds to mimic. They will learn to collaborate and take their turns by following classroom rules and routines exhibiting responsibility for self.

Instructions

Step 1:

Sit down, and form a circle with the children to play a simple game.

Step 2:

Play music and pass a ball around in the circle.

Step 3:

When the music stops, the child holding the ball should growl like a bear. “Grrr”! Repeat for those in the group to get a chance.

Playful Questions

Which animal sound do you like to make?

How are the children engaging with each other as they pass the ball around?

Are the infants able to mimic the sound of some forest animals with guidance?

Do the toddlers and infants work collaboratively by sharing, and passing the ball to the next person beside them?

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