Raindrop Melted Crayon Sun Catchers

On a rainy day, this activity will make the blues go away as your child creates their own raindrops out of crayon shavings while using their fine motor skills and predicting what will happen when you add heat! Once finished, their creations will make fun decorations around your home or childcare center.

Transform crayons into decorative raindrops!

This activity is great for a rainy day! Using everyday items and easy to set up, your child can use their imagination to create unique “raindrops” by using crayons and some science. Have your child peel some used blue crayons and sharpen them over some waxed paper. Then, use an iron (adults only!) to melt the wax. Once it is dry, the crayons will harden and then can be cut into raindrop shapes.

💡 So much to learn: You can extend this activity by cutting out additional shapes or using different crayon colors.

📚 Books to explore: Come On, Rain! by Karen Hesse, Split! Splat! by Amy S. Gibson, and Tap Tap Boom Boom by Elizabeth Bluemle.

⭐ Pro tip: Make sure to not run the iron too long over the wax paper or push down hard, or else the wax will spill out the sides and all over your iron.

Materials

For this activity you will need:

Different shades of blue crayons 

Crayon sharpener

Wax paper 

Scissors 

Iron (for adults only!) 

Hole punch 

String 

Tape

Learning Outcomes

Domain

Physical

Skills

Fine motor

Indicators:

Adapting holding from palmar or pincer grasp

Instructions

Step 1:

Have your child pick the shades of blue they want to use.

Step 2:

Cut a large piece of wax paper and lay it down on a table.

Step 3:

Peel the wrappers off of the crayons.

Step 4:

Sharpen a crayon over the wax paper. Repeat this step with several different colors.

Step 5:

Group the shavings into large clumps and then place another piece of wax paper over the shavings, leaving plenty of space between the wax and the edges of the wax paper.

Step 6:

Lightly run an iron over the wax paper and set aside to cool down.

Step 7:

Cut out teardrop shapes from the hardened crayon wax, punch with the hole punch and hang up in a window using string and tape.

⬆️ For older preschoolers: Have the children cut their own shapes out of the paper, with supervision of course. They also can experiment with different colors or shapes.

⬇️ For younger toddlers: Your child will probably need lots of help with the sharpener, or you may want to this step for them.

🦺 Stay safe! An adult should be the only one using the iron!

Playful Questions

Do you know what shades are? 

How many crayons should we use? 

What do you think will happen if we use the iron? 

What other shapes can we make? 

What do these colors remind you of?