Pom Pom Ghost Craft

This pom pom ghost craft is super easy to put together for children and will help young ones practice their fine motor skills and, art planning skills while getting excited about the Halloween season! Really, for this activity, you need 5 things which, can be found around your house fairly easily. Switch up the spooky ghost for a pumpkin or bat if you wish!

Download and Print

Activity PDF

Develop fine motor skills with this quick, easy, and super cute ghost art activity!

Boo! Don’t let this art activity scare you away! It’s super easy to put together and kids will love the independence of creating their ghost on paper. They can make it as large, small, friendly, or scary as they want! Bonus: they’ll be practicing their fine motor skills and it'll be relatively mess-free!  

📚Get inspired: Read a friendly book about ghosts, they can be friendly too! “ Teeny Tiny Ghost” by Rachel Matson is a great introduction for kids.

👉 Pro Tip: Some kids may not be able to hold a pom-pom; use larger cotton balls or add a clothespin to help young children grip the small object. 

😊 Smile! This is a great way for children to see how different faces on the ghost may bring up different emotions. A smile makes a friendly ghost, a frown may make a scary ghost. Ask your child - can you do the same faces as the ghost? How do you feel?

Materials

For this activity you will need:

Dark blue and black construction paper

White paint

 Pom Pom (or cotton balls)

Plate/dish for paint

Scissors

Glue

Clothespin (optional)

Learning Outcomes

Domain

Physical

Skills

Fine Motor

Indicators:

Using tools with the pincer grasp

Instructions

Step 1:

Pour some white paint into your dish.

Step 2:

Pick up a pom pom and have your child use it to print the shape of a ghost onto the blue construction paper. 

Step 3:

Trace a mouth (the letter “D”) and 2 eyes (2, letter “O’s”) and cut them out. Once the paint is dry, glue them to the middle of your ghost.

Step 4: 

Ta-Da! You’re left with an adorable ghost! 

⬆️ For older preschoolers:  Have older children cut out the eyes and mouth for their ghost. This allows them to determine the proper size for each facial feature of their ghost. It may be “too big” or “too small” but that’s ok, they’re practicing!

⬇️ For younger toddlers: Smaller fingers may need the help of a clothespin to hold the pom-pom while gaining control of their fine motor skills.

Playful Questions

Can you count how many dots are in the ghost you’ve made?

What letters do the eyes and mouth of your ghost look like?

How can we make our ghost look scary?

How can you tell by the ghost’s mouth that they’re happy? 

How did you know how much paint to use for your ghost?